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  • Global warming brews big trouble in coffee birthplace Ethiopia

    Global warming is likely to wipe out half of the coffee growing area in Ethiopia, the birthplace of the bean, according to a groundbreaking new study. Rising temperatures have already damaged some special areas of origin, with these losses being likened to France losing one of its great wine regions.

    Ethiopia’s highlands also host a unique treasure trove of wild coffee varieties, meaning new flavour profiles and growing traits could be lost before having been discovered. However, the new research also reveals that if a massive programme of moving plantations up hillsides to cooler altitudes were feasible, coffee production could actually increase.

    Coffee vies with tea as the world’s favorite beverage and employs 100 million people worldwide in farming the beans alone. But climate change is coffee’s greatest long-term threat, killing plantations or reducing bean quality and allowing the deadly coffee leaf rust fungus to thrive. Without major action both in the coffee industry and in slashing greenhouse gas emissions, coffee is predicted to become more expensive and worse-tasting.

    The research combined climate-change computer modelling with detailed measurements of current ground conditions, gathered in fieldwork that covered a total distance of 30,000km within Ethiopia. It found that 40-60% of today’s coffee growing areas in Ethiopia would be unsuitable by the end of the century under a range of likely warming scenarios.

    But the study, published in the journal Nature Plants, also shows that major relocation programmes could preserve or even expand the country’s coffee-growing areas. “There is a pathway to resilience, even under climate change,” said Aaron Davis, at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew in the UK, who conducted the work with Ethiopian scientists. “But it is a hugely daunting task. Millions of farmers would have to change.”

    However, by 2040, such moves uphill will have reached the top of Ethiopia’s mountains. “It literally reaches the ceiling, because you don’t have any higher place to go,” Davis said.

    The impacts of global warming are already being seen as temperatures have been rising steadily in Ethiopia for decades. Farmers report a longer, more extreme dry season and more intense rain in the wet season, with good harvests much less frequent than in their parents and grandparents’ time.

    Read More: theguardian

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  • Ethiopian Wins Bombardier’s Airline Reliability Performance Award

    Africa’s largest airline group, Ethiopian Airlines, announced that it has won the 2016 Airline Reliability Performance Award, for the 6th year in a row.

     The Award recognizes operators of Bombardier CRJ Series regional jets and Q Series turboprops that have achieved the highest rates of dispatch reliability.
    CEO of Ethiopian Airlines, Tewolde GebreMariam said “In line with our continuous effort to provide our customers a seamless travel experience, Bombardier Q400 NextGen aircrafts has enabled us offer the best on board experience on our regional and domestic routes.”

     “Moreover, through our strategic partnerships with ASKY Airlines in Togo and Malawian Airlines in Malawi, the Q400 airliner has played a vital role in availing convenient connections, as well as increasing frequencies to support air travel growth in Africa and successfully create a missing link” he said.

     Ethiopian flies the Q-400 to 20 domestic destinations and regional routes such as Djibouti, Mombasa, Kilimanjaro, Dar-es-Salaam, Zanzibar, Entebbe, Kigali, Juba, Khartoum and Hargeisa.

     Ethiopian is multi award winning carrier and has recently been crowned as ‘African Airline of the Year 2017 Award’, ‘Cargo Airline Award for Network Development at Brussels’ in June and March respectively.

    Source: ENA

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  • 5 Ethiopian Multi-Millionaires You Should Know

    A few Ethiopians have built multi-million and billion dollar empires in industries as diverse as agriculture, food, construction, energy and distribution and earned multi-million dollar fortunes to boot. Their names don’t ring with the African public, and you’ve probably never heard about them before, but they are very successful — and very wealthy. Meet 5 Ethiopian entrepreneurs, who own businesses with annual revenues of $50 million or more.

    Belayneh Kindie

    Source: Agricultural Commodities

    Belayneh Kindie Import And Export (BKIEA), the eponymous company Belayneh founded and runs, is the largest agricultural commodities trading company in Ethiopia. He founded the company in 2005 to primarily export oil seeds and subsequently expanded into other commodities such as sesame seeds and nuts. Its commodities trading business has revenues of a little over $60 million in 2016. The company also has a thriving transportation business that boasts a fleet of more than 100 dry & fuel cargo trucks. BKIEA also owns hotels in Ethiopia and a port handling service company.

     

    Tewodros Ashenafi

    Source: Oil

    Ashenafi is the chairman and co-owner of Ambo Mineral Water, Ethiopia’s bestselling naturally-carbonated bottled mineral water, along with beverage giant SABMiller. He is also the founder and CEO of oil exploration firm SouthWest Energy, one the largest oil and gas acreage holders in East Africa. SouthWest has a leading acreage position in the Jijiga Basin, Ethiopia’s largest proven hydrocarbon-bearing sedimentary basin, covering an area of approximately 350,000 km2 and in the eastern region of Ethiopia bordering Somaliland.

     

    Buzuayehu T. Bizenu

    Source: Diversified

    Bizenu is the chairman and controlling shareholder of East African Holding, a leading industrial conglomerate in Ethiopia that operates in a variety of sectors such as manufacturing of Fast Moving Consumer Goods, tea processing, printing and packaging, transport, real estate, cement production and coal mining.

    Ato Ketema Kebede

    Source: Diversified

    Kebede is the founder of KK PLC, an Ethiopian company that manufactures blankets primarily to export across Africa and North America. The company also owns an acrylic yarn dyeing plant, and is also engaged in the import and distribution of heavy-duty machineries and equipment for mining, construction, road making and quarrying. The company is also one of the largest exporters of Ethiopian coffee, cereals and spices.

     Akiko Seyoum Ambaye

    Source: Construction

    Akiko Ambaye, one of Ethiopia’s most prominent female business leaders, is the founder of Orchid Business Group (OBG), an Ethiopian construction company engaged in road construction, the supply of construction materials, rental services of construction machinery and haulage.

    Source: forbes

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  • Ethiopian to Inaugurate New Cargo Terminal

    The Ethiopian Airlines is going to inaugurate a new cargo terminal on the sideline of the second ICAO Global Air Cargo Development Forum to be hosted by the airline this month.

    The inauguration of its state of the art Cargo Terminal-II, will position the national flag carrier at the top in the continent in terms of cargo service.

    Group CEO Ethiopian Airlines, Tewolde Gebremariam said “The new Cargo Terminal-II combined with our existing Terminal-I will give us a total tonnage capacity of around one million per annum which is the largest in the continent of Africa.”

    Covering a total area of 150,000 m2, the new Cargo Terminal includes dry and perishable cargo terminals, fully automated elevating transport vehicle, among others.

    It is also fitted with different climate chambers for storage and handling of temperature sensitive products such as fresh agricultural products and pharmaceuticals.

    “Infrastructure development being one of the four pillars of our fast, profitable and sustainable growth strategic roadmap, Vision 2025, we have been making massive investments in infrastructure projects to modernize and expand our cargo facilities at a total cost of USD 150 million” Tewolde said.

    Upon completion of the second phase, which adds 600, 000 tones annual uplift capacity, Ethiopian Cargo and Logistics Services will have one of the world’s largest cargo terminals - a capability equivalent to cargo terminals in Amsterdam Schiphol, Singapore Changi, or Hong Kong, the CEO said.

    This investment along with the eight modern freighters will create adequate air cargo transporting capacity for the fast growing export and import demand of the continent.

    Ethiopian Cargo and Logistics Services operates eight freighters to 39 global freighter destinations in Africa, the Gulf, Middle East, Asia and Europe with an average daily uplift capacity of 650 tons on top of the belly hold capacity of 150 tons to over 95 destinations globally.

    It was recalled that the Ethiopian Cargo and Logistics Services has recently won ‘Cargo Airline Award for Network Development” at Brussels; ‘African Cargo Airline of the Year’ among others.

    Source: ENA

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